Category: NEW ORLEANS TRI-CENTENNIAL 1718 TO 2018

Dear readers, Below is the penultimate entry in this seemingly endless coverage of that area, called by the Native Americans, Brubancha – the land of many tongues. We call this area home, or to be less trite – the Greater New Orleans area, La Ile d’Orleans, including SE Louisiana and the Gulf Coast to Pensacola. […]

To summarize the New Orleans “Indian Question” then, in the first twenty years of the eighteenth century, today’s city and its metropolitan area were populated by several small groups or “tribes” of Natives mostly speaking dialects of Choctaw. The Quinipissa and/or the Acolapissa (probably one and the same) definitely lived on Bayou St. John before […]

  We left the French sharing their “Gallic” attitude with the Natives, and so . . . If you ask the proverbial ‘New Orleanian on the street today’ about the local Indians who were here at the founding of the city in 1718, you will undoubtedly hear that the Houma, Choctaw, Tunica, Tchoupitoulas, and/or Natchez […]

HAPPY NEW YEAR EVERYONE. I promise I won’t repeat this for a long time (maybe a couple of months). But to just set the tone once more re: the TriCentennial. The date of the founding of New Orleans may be placed anywhere  (depending on how one defines “founding”) between 1717 and 1722. So I plan […]

French Exploration of the North American Prairies and Relations With The Indians of the Great Plains. It is an oft repeated cliché that the French colony of Louisiana “was a failure,” and while this argument may hold some water, especially under the regime of the Crozat company and the successor Company of the Indies up […]

MADAME LANGLOIS PUTS DOWN THE PETTICOAT REBELLION In recent weeks, Governor Bienville in his infinite wisdom has settled down the fierce rebellion led by the recent female arrivals from France. Confronted with Indian Maize and the so-called cornmeal, the ladies insisted on French (or at least Louisiana) wheat with which to bake their baguettes. Madame […]

Apologies for the long hiatus. No excuses – just everyday life crowding out everything else. Now the holidays are upon us. As the Tricentennial year winds down to an end, I remind ya’ll again that the Tricentennial really extends from 2017 thru 2022 (when N.O. becomes the capital of Louisiana, 1722). Two things to announce […]